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Poetic Patterns

Updated: May 24, 2022

A visual campaign of connecting the art of timeless prints with poetry.


The magic of art is in its myriad existence and how it manifests itself in different aspects of life. Artists all around have a plethora of mediums to choose from, in prints, paintings, songs, music, poetry, cinema and so much more.


Patterns and Prints are a visual experience that offers intimate insights with its intricacies. Laced with floral motifs and elements in a in a multitude of colour palettes, each print is richly woven in an imagery that is inspired from everyday life where different elements come together in symphony. Similar to the rhythmic movements of poetry, where each verse connects to tell a story.





Sung by the king of ghazals, Jagjit Singh’s deep voice compliments the intoxicating poetry of ‘Hoshwalon ko khabar kya’, a song that talks about the simplicity of love with its nuances.


Paired with a crimson Rajasthani pattern with teal floral motifs, that instantly draws you in with its intricate details.









The beauty of Sanganari prints lies in the symmetry of block patterns and intricate details, with motifs inspired by elements of nature. A similar rhythmic symmetry is found in Wajid Shaikh’s collection of shayaris that talk about love and life, and its many complex charms.










The Brocade textile comes in a bold weave, a classic play of metallic threads in a raised pattern. The Safavid Brocade panel is an Irani design from the late 17th- early 18th century, woven in lush silk and metal threads.











William Morris’s ‘Kelmscott Tree’ print is inspired by beauty, imagination and the order of nature. Similar to Mirza Ghalib’s reflection of human nature with lyrical prose, where he talks about the eternal charm of simplicity and innocence.








Rumi’s poems are a spiritual exploration of the simple joys in life, inviting us to look at ourselves and the world around us with a more understanding view.


In this couplet, Rumi notes how moments of awareness and choice are very subtle and talks about the passion needed for change. What is it that you really want? Remind yourself of it and “don’t go back to sleep.”




A lone flower surrounded with blooming buds and leaves recall the same longing as Mirza Ghalib’s ghazal ‘Dil -e-Nadaan’. The lyrics question the heart and it’s longing for a love that is gone, sung by different artists in different renditions. The most recent came in the Netflix series of ‘The Suitable Boy’, with Tabu as a highlight of the ghazal.







The print is part of the ‘A Fine Palampore’ pattern, full of blooming flowers in different stages with a fine floral design border.









Named after the artist’s daughter, the ‘Marguerite in Indigo’ print features a floral cartouche in a coral and indigo palette on a crisp off white base. The floral pattern evokes a certain serenity with its symmetry. Similar to Arunoday Singh’s meditative poetry style, where simplicity meets a devoted passion of shared emotion.




A lyrical gem of Gulzar, ‘Mera Kuch Samaan Lauta doh’ is a request from a dejected lover, as she recollects all the memories and moments, yearning for it to come back. Sung in the movie Ijaazat with Naseeruddin Shah and Rekha, the Gulzar poetry blurs the line between prose and music with its free verse and non rhythmic lyrics.






Paired with a print that is a classic example of mughal marble ornamentation, a display of delicate ornamentation work on white marble and red sandstone compliments the soothing patterns of the song.








Lyricist Fayyaz Hashmi wrote Aaj Jaane Ki Zid Na Karo for a Pakistani film but the world has learnt to love the song only after it was sung by Farida Khanum. The texture of her voice adds weight to every word of the poem, a lover’s desire reflecting in every note she takes.


A French print of the late 18th century, made in a lush maroon shade which almost reflects the yearning and longing of the prose with its complex floral motifs.





Despite the different threads and notes that come together in prints and poetry, the medium may be different, but the narrative is always inspired by art, heritage and culture that translates into a shared emotion that we experience collectively.

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